George Stevens

Biography

George Stevens (December 18, 1904 - March 8, 1975) was an American film director, producer, screenwriter and cinematographer. Born in Oakland, California, Stevens broke into the movie business as a cameraman, working on many Laurel and Hardy shorts. His first feature film was The Cohens and Kellys in Trouble in 1933. In 1934 he got his first directing job, the slapstick Kentucky Kernels. His big break came when he directed Katharine Hepburn in Alice Adams in 1935. He went on in the late 1930s to direct several Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire movies, not only with the two actors together, but on their own. In 1940, he directed Carole Lombard in Vigil in the Night, and the film has an alternate ending for European audiences in recognition of World War II, which the US had not yet entered. During the Second World War, Stevens joined the U.S. Army Signal Corps and headed a film unit from 1943 to 1946, under General Eisenhower. His unit shot footage documenting D-Day—including the only Allied European Front color film of the war—the liberation of Paris and the meeting of American and Soviet forces at the Elbe River, as well as horrific scenes from the Duben labor camp and the Dachau concentration camp. Stevens also helped prepare the Duben and Dachau footage and other material for presentation during the Nuremberg Trials.[1] In 2008, his footage was entered into the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as an "essential visual record" of World War II.[2] One result of his World War II experiences was that his subsequent films became more dramatic. I Remember Mama in 1948 was the last movie that he made with comic scenes. He was responsible for such classic films as A Place in the Sun, Shane, The Diary of Anne Frank, Giant and The Greatest Story Ever Told. Stevens is the father of TV and film writer-producer-director George Stevens, Jr. (who was named the first CEO and director of the American Film Institute), and is the grandfather of TV and film producer-director Michael Stevens. Stevens died following a heart attack on his ranch in Lancaster, California, north of Los Angeles. Stevens has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1701 Vine Street.

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Known For
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George Stevens: D-Day To Berlin

Himself (archive footage)

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1939: Hollywood's Greatest Year

Himself (archive footage)

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George Stevens: A Filmmaker's Journey

Self (archive footage)

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James Dean: Forever Young

Self (archive footage)

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Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

Poole - Jekyll's Butler (uncredited)

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Witchery

Fisherman

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Shane

Knock Him Into That Pigpen, Chris! (voice) (uncredited)

Starring In
Movie Poster

1939: Hollywood's Greatest Year

Himself (archive footage)

Movie Poster

James Dean: Forever Young

Self (archive footage)

Movie Poster

George Stevens: D-Day To Berlin

Himself (archive footage)

Movie Poster

Witchery

Fisherman

Movie Poster

George Stevens: A Filmmaker's Journey

Self (archive footage)

Movie Poster

Shane

Knock Him Into That Pigpen, Chris! (voice) (uncredited)

Movie Poster

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

Poole - Jekyll's Butler (uncredited)

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